Pit2Pub

Thought this may interest some people…

Thanks Dawn Allen for the original.

Dawn Allen

The Intro: Who has fun spending hours creating that perfect 140-character pitch? Then bouncing that sentence or two off others to see if it’s fantastic? And finally having to create a couple more so you’re not posting the same one every few hours?

The Why: Kristin and Ann know what you’re going through. In fact, they both did quite a few Twitter Pitch Parties so they know your pain. Kristin remembers what it was like to see that little colored star and then checking and re-checking email to confirm that someone did in fact click on the pitch and favorite it. And Ann’s recalls her heart pounding and her palms sweaty, all the while hoping and praying that it wasn’t made by accident from a friend or some complete stranger who marked it and not re-tweeted it by mistake. They both trolled the feed all day long and didn’t work…

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Pinning up a cover design

So then. Pintrest. What do you make of it?

I had always figured Pinterest was a little bit girly and just a faster and more efficient way for our female better halves to embark on some window shopping and compile lists of the many things they want, that we can never afford to buy them.

And I was right.

However.

I have just discovered a brilliant way that we as writers can use Pinterest… Well, actually, it was my wife’s idea, and when I say we as writers, I actually mean we writers who self publish and have to design a cover.

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What are you revealing online? Much more than you think

Very interesting this one. Thanks, Ted, for the original.

ideas.ted.com

QWA-category-Reveal

What can be guessed about you from your online behavior? Two computer privacy experts — economist Alessandro Acquisti and computer scientist Jennifer Golbeck — on how little we know about how much others know.

The best indicator of high intelligence on Facebook is apparently liking a page for curly fries. At least, that’s according to computer scientist Jennifer Golbeck (TED Talk: The curly fry conundrum), whose job is to figure out what we reveal about ourselves through what we say — and don’t say — online. Of course, the lines between online and “real” are increasingly blurred, but as Golbeck and privacy economist Alessandro Acquisti (TED Talk: Why privacy matters) both agree, that’s no reason to stop paying attention. TED got the two together to discuss what the web knows about you, and what we can do about the things we’d rather it forgot. An edited version of the conversation follows.

I…

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