Screenwriting… easy, right?

As I mentioned in my previous post, I have got this blog back up an running mainly to give myself some focus and get myself witting fit again.

But why?

Well, with my novel complete and yet far too niche for any agents to bite, I will self-publish that, put it to the side and let the millions and adoration come rolling on in. Done. But then what do I do to fill in my time? Another novel? Hmmm (I pondered, whilst watching some series or other on Amazon) And that’s when it hit me POW! Screenwriting! Of course! With this current revolution in the way we all watch TV – moving from network channels to online viewing and box sets – there is a now a huge market for screenwriters. And not only that; it seems almost anything is given consideration, going by some of the concepts inherent in the new shows presently available from Amazon and Netflix Originals (please note that I am not referring here to the Grand Tour on Amazon, which is load of tripe).

So, with a novel that no publisher wants behind me, it’s time to look forward… although saying that, I am tempted to turn my novel into a screenplay, as much to gain experience than anything else. I’ll let you know what I discover along the way.

And so on that subject, I am now going to return to reading my screenplay bible – The Complete Screenwriting Course by Charles Harris – and will be back in touch soon to see where I am going to go with this.

What I can tell you right now, however, is that at first glance screenwriting is a lot more complex than simply churning out a story. But who said this was going to be easy? (Well, actually, the promoters of the book I’m reading kind of hinted at it, but I guess they have to).

Thanks for reading

It’s been a while…

So now I’m back, from outer space… (sing along if you know the words)

If I’m honest, that’s not actually too far from the truth. Of course I haven’t actually been to outer space, but I am back from putting into place what I think may be the last edits on my novel (finally)… which is set in outer space. And, yes, I’m back; back to the blog.

Why such a huge gap from my previous post? Well, lack of motivation I guess is the answer. It’s hard to keep writing when there’s not that much of interest to say. Naturally, I think that everything I say is interesting, but I’m not so naive to believe that everyone else finds my mutterings entertaining. In that case then, I hear you ask, why am I coming back to blog?

Well I guess I’d love to say it’s down to a new-found injection of motivation, which would be partly true, but it’s also down to necessity. I need to get myself writing again. I’m not very ‘writing fit’ at the moment, which is a horrible feeling because a few years ago – and in an analogy to ‘running fit’ (which I actually am) – I could run out a few thousand words in one sitting, and yet now, after just a longish paragraph I feel the need to rest, down an energy gel (in the form of a cup of coffee) and walk for a little ways (in the form of sitting down to watch something on Netflix).

Enough!

Time to strap on my speedy fingertips, engage my sluggish brain and, as the very first action in my new fitness regime, get back to regular blogging. Not simply to write again, but additionally to give myself a goal once again; that small nagging demand in the back of my Netflix-addicted brain that pulls me in the direction I need to go.

So that’s it for now. All this writing; I’m knackered.

I will explain where I intended to take my new writing fitness in the next post, but right now… back to Netflix.

Just kidding; I’m actually going for a run.

Thanks for reading.

(And thanks NASA, for the image)

All the numbers are lining up, which means what exactly…?

So this week it seemed that all the numbers on my blog lined up. In fact, it all happened on the very same day:

First I celebrated my one-year anniversary of How Do You Pronounce Eynon; then I bagged my 200th follower; then I posted my 70th post. Those babies all seem nice and tidy to me, and none of it was planned.

Is this portentous? Maybe; maybe not. All I know for sure is that it made me smile, and that’s always a good thing.

Screen Shot 2015-09-14 at 09.46.40

So, while I am in this realm of getting all my ducks in a row, perhaps a lottery win wouldn’t go amiss.. all I need to do now is go and buy a ticket.

Thanks for reading… I mean it.

To Serve a King: A swashbuckling sci-fi short story…

To celebrate getting my short story published in the New Accelerator magazine, I have decided to put it out as a blog post. Enjoy…

To Serve a King

The pressgangs never came around here. Why would they? Pickings for naval impressment were slim in Albany. As one of the kingdom’s more remote regions and situated near the petering end of the Good Hope trade wind, the place was populated mostly by farmers. Granted, there were plenty of scrapyarders and a handful of metal workers here, but experienced sailors were few and far between.

And yet, the dreaded pressgangs had arrived.

Continue reading

What’s in a title? (Apart from words, that is)

We all know that covers sell books. But what about titles? How important is it that we get the right title? A title that invokes the spirit of the story; a title that describes the story; a title that grabs the readers’ attention?

To highlight the impact of a good title, I’m going to recall a story that happened to me recently. But it doesn’t involve books; it involves music.

Screen Shot 2014-11-24 at 17.57.20 Continue reading

AUTHORS: Three Circumtances to Let Readers Know You Share Their Frustration

I really like the way this touched on a subject not often mentioned around the blogosphere, so I just had to reblog. Thank you Victoria Grefer for the original.
Enjoy…

Creative Writing with the Crimson League

reading-books-at-home-1145735-mThis post is about annoyed readers: specifically, how we authors can “annoy” readers in a way that’s NOT annoying. Or at least, how we can annoy them in a way that they’ll accept and overlook.

Confused yet? Let me explain.

There are times when a necessary aspect of fiction might frustrate or annoy a reader; when authors know that’s the case, a great strategy to approach the troublesome point is to make it obvious that you, the author, feel the same way the reader does.

Remember: this is for necessary aspects of your work that might be annoying or troublesome.

And that is the first point I want to make. Clearly, when some part of your novel or short story is cumbersome, or frustrating, and it is possible to cut it, you cut it. If you can tone it down in any way, throw some of the focus elsewhere, you…

View original post 729 more words

It’s only a name, surely?

There’s no question that picking a name to give our offspring is a massive decision. But why? It’s only a name isn’t it? Why should we care what their title is? I mean, it’s not as if that decision made there in the hospital delivery suite will affect how the rest of their lives will turn out, is it?

Is it?

I think it is. Or at least, it is in part.

I think somebody’s name can have implications far beyond what they are called.

Picture 2Names are important. They can label us, pigeonhole us, stereotype us, empower us and haunt us. If names really weren’t important, I’d have loved to call our girls something crazy and eccentric like ‘Boudicca’, ‘Calamity Jane’ or ‘Princess Powderkeg’. But we didn’t. Naturally, we gave them both lovely names, but not anything so extreme they’d spend their lives’ accounting for our moment of indulgence.

And so what I want to talk about here (and it is relevant, I promise) is how names can affect our perception of a character – and not only in fiction.

For me there are two ways a name can be linked to character traits: by association or by intention. Continue reading