All the numbers are lining up, which means what exactly…?

So this week it seemed that all the numbers on my blog lined up. In fact, it all happened on the very same day:

First I celebrated my one-year anniversary of How Do You Pronounce Eynon; then I bagged my 200th follower; then I posted my 70th post. Those babies all seem nice and tidy to me, and none of it was planned.

Is this portentous? Maybe; maybe not. All I know for sure is that it made me smile, and that’s always a good thing.

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So, while I am in this realm of getting all my ducks in a row, perhaps a lottery win wouldn’t go amiss.. all I need to do now is go and buy a ticket.

Thanks for reading… I mean it.

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I get this… but I just don’t GET it

Part four of my series that looks to apply every single rule from Strunk and White’s The Elements of Style to my manuscript. Today, rules 9, 10 & 11.

First of all, I shall admit that these last few rules on Elementary Rules of Usage are, for me, quite a ways from being elementary. In other words, I don’t really understand them. I can study rule 9 and place it into the context of my manuscript, but the others…? We’ll see.

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A few more sage words of advice…

So yesterday I posted a quote a from Colum McCann that I found in a Q&A at the back of his book Let the Great Word Spin. 

Slightly remiss of me was to leave out the question from Nathan Englander that actually prompted this response, which is a brilliant quote in-of-itself:

Screen Shot 2015-09-01 at 12.31.01Authorial intent doesn’t much matter once the book is out there. If I write a funny, happy story, and all it ever does is make people cry – well then it’s a sad story, whether I agree or not. What the reader sees on the page is what’s there.

Nathan Englander.

Sage words of advice from an awesome author…

So I’ve just finished the astounding book Let the Great World Spin by Colum McCann, and while this is not a book review, I shall take second to advise anyone to read it:

Go read this book. It’s brilliant.

Done.

Anyway, at the back of this novel is a Q&A session with the author where he says this about his readers:

Screen Shot 2015-09-01 at 12.31.01“As writers we have to respect and like our readers. I want to acknowledge that they have taken a chance and that, more than likely they’re smarter than me, or more courageous, or at the very least they will continue the book further than I can. They can complete the story.”

Colum McCann

This is wonderful quote that I think any writer should take note of. Hence the reason I stuck it in a post.

Thanks for reading.

A beach awaits…

I know that the subject of air shows is a little touchy at the moment, but I had an experience at the Bournemouth Air show last week that I just had to share. And, no, thankfully nothing crashed.

I’ve been to a few air shows in my time, and seeing a crowd of spectators looking into the sky at some crazy pilot pulling off a spectacular manoeuvre is nothing new to me.

But this was…

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Colons, dashes, and broken sentences…

And so here is the next instalment of my series that looks to apply every single rule from Strunk and White’s The Elements of Style to my manuscript. Today, rules 6, 7 & 8.

6. Do not break sentences in two.

The Elements of Style, Strunk and WhiteWhat S&W are saying here is to be careful with where you put a full-stop. Ok, so it sounds elementary and their example below is really just a case of bad writing:

I met them on a Cunard liner many years ago. Coming home from Liverpool to New York.

See. Just bad writing.

They do, however, mention the clipping of a sentence if a certain emphasis is warranted:

Again and again he called out. No reply.

I do this quite a lot in my writing. S&W’s advise on the matter is that it’s fine in dialogue, but when used in narrative one must ensure the emphasis is warranted lest a clipped sentence seem merely a blunder in syntax or in punctuation.

I’ll do that. Thanks. 

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To Serve a King: A swashbuckling sci-fi short story…

To celebrate getting my short story published in the New Accelerator magazine, I have decided to put it out as a blog post. Enjoy…

To Serve a King

The pressgangs never came around here. Why would they? Pickings for naval impressment were slim in Albany. As one of the kingdom’s more remote regions and situated near the petering end of the Good Hope trade wind, the place was populated mostly by farmers. Granted, there were plenty of scrapyarders and a handful of metal workers here, but experienced sailors were few and far between.

And yet, the dreaded pressgangs had arrived.

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